2019 Sustainability Symposium Sessions

Learn more about the Sustainability Symposium, happening Friday, May 3rd at Penn State at The Navy Yard.  

 

Achieving Decarbonization Goals through Building Codes

Cities and states are setting ambitious climate and sustainability goals with specific carbon reduction targets by 2030, 2040, and 2050. Buildings are responsible for 40 percent of U.S. carbon emissions, and U.S. buildings alone use more energy than every country except China. Building energy codes are one of the most effective policies for reducing building energy use and are increasingly important in the absence of federal action to combat climate change, but without addressing critical obstacles to building energy code adoption, enforcement, and compliance, many cities and states will not be able to achieve their decarbonization goals.

This session will provide examples of city and state policies that use energy codes as tools to meet these goals. The session will also discuss obstacles to the adoption of progressive energy codes, challenges in code enforcement and compliance, and best practices for overcoming these hurdles.

Level 100: Awareness

Presenters 

Mike Turns, Performance Systems Development 
Kim Cheslak, Institute for Market Transformation
Katie Bartolotta, Green Building United

 

Beyond Benchmarking: Tapping into market resources and tools to close building performance gaps

Benchmarking is just the first step. To activate your plan, you need to know where and how to get started. PECO Building Assessment Reports (BAR) offer customers a site-specific and easy-to-digest summary of annual energy usage, costs, and specific recommendations for potential savings opportunities. By using facility information and 30-minute kW interval data to show energy variations based on weather, day-of-week, and building schedule, customers can easily “see” where their systems are falling short, prioritize, and immediately take action. Reports include recommendations for building retrocommissioning, controls, maintenance, and energy efficiency projects to assist with reducing overall energy use and fulfilling the City of Philadelphia’s energy benchmarking requirements.  

This presentation will also highlight utility, PJM, State, and commodity-based incentives that can assist in funding facility upgrades. 

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

Rachel Krueger, PECO Smart Ideas
Mike Newman, CMC Energy Services
Moderator | Tom Brubaker, PECO

 

Campus Energy Savings by Continuous Automated Commissioning at Temple University

As part of a larger energy study for Temple University, a pilot project implementing Continuous Commissioning (CAC), sometimes called Fault Detection, was implemented at three buildings on Temple's main campus. The presentation will start at the energy study phase, go through preliminary and final design, and wrap up with implementation and operations. Temple has been using the system for several years now and will present data and anecdotal information on the performance of the system. The presentation will cover the challenges and benefits of implementing CAC on campus systems.

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

William Pitz, RMF Engineering, Inc.
Nicholas Beale, Temple University
Jim Harven, The Efficiency Network

 

Can your spec reverse global warming?

The building sector is the world’s single largest emitter of greenhouse gases (GHGs), accounting for 30 - 40 percent of total global GHG emissions. Although operational emissions account for more of a building's carbon footprint over its entire life, between now and 2030 almost 75 percent of the carbon footprint of that 900 billion square feet will be embodied carbon, not operational emissions. Building products can reduce their carbon footprints and even become carbon sinks that help remove excess greenhouse gases from the atmosphere. Since organizations like Architecture 2030, AIA, and USGBC have traditionally focused on reducing operational carbon emissions, shifting some of our focus to address the more immediate challenge of embodied carbon requires wide-spread education on the emerging toolbox available to industry professionals.

This session will equip manufacturers, architects, designers, and other building industry professionals with specific and practical strategies for selecting products and materials that reduce embodied carbon emissions and move the industry toward making buildings part of the solution instead of less of the problem.

Level 100: Awareness

Presenters 

Megan O’Connell, Skanska
Dennis Wilson, materialsCAN/CertainTeed
Jim Camp, Gensler
Holly Harshman, Gensler
Moderator | Lisa Conway, materialsCAN/Interface

 

Closing the Loop on Transparency

Creating a healthy materials economy requires participation from across the building and design industry. Over the past several years, building product manufacturers across multiple product categories have responded to the calls from the design community for more ingredients and environmental transparency through the creation of hundreds of Declare Labels, EPD's, HPD's, and others. In July 2018, 38 leading building product manufacturers wrote a letter to the architecture and design community urging them to take the next steps to close the loop on transparency by specifying and advocating to owners for transparent materials.

During this interactive session, presenters will explore the role designers and specifiers need to play in the materials economy. Presenters will discuss current barriers for incorporating materials transparency and potential solutions to these barriers in an open dialogue with event participants. Participants will also hear from Tarkett about the company’s sustainability journey and how it ultimately led them to pursue the Living Product Challenge.

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

Gemma Antoniewicz, GreenCircle Certified
Dhruv Raina, Tarkett USA Inc.
Christopher Lee, Jacobswyper Architects

 

Community Solar for Greener Buildings

Community solar will provide access to solar energy for all Pennsylvanians, allowing customers to subscribe to a portion of a large array. Large community solar systems can provide energy at very competitive prices, offering multiple advantages to customers and green building owners, and making it easier to reach net zero and other green building standards.

The PA Solar Energy Industries Association (PASEIA) and the Philadelphia Solar Energy Association (PSEA) are working with a broad coalition of organizations and bipartisan groups of legislators in both the House and Senate. Legislation has been introduced and is expected to pass in  2019.

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenters 

Ron Celentano, PA Solar Energy Industries Association
Roger Clark, The Reinvestment Fund
Liz Robinson, Philadelphia Solar Energy Association

 

C-PACE in Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania became the 35th state to enable Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (C-PACE) in the summer of 2018. C-PACE is a financing tool for energy efficiency, renewable energy, and water conservation systems on commercial properties. Over $700 million has been invested through C-PACE in the last several years.

Attendees will hear about projects from across the region that have utilized C-PACE and will learn about local opportunities in Pennsylvania to finance commercial renewable energy and energy efficiency projects with C-PACE. This session will review Pennsylvania program technical requirements, including the baseline survey, measurement and verification, energy efficiency standards, and other guidelines.

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenters 

Abby Johnson, Abacus Property Solutions 

Julian Boggs, Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance

Emily Schapira, Philadelphia Energy Authority

John Costlow, Sustainable Energy Fund

 

Deploying Urban Solar: Bringing PV to a diversity of communities and buildings in Philadelphia

Philadelphia is the fourth fastest growing urban solar market in the country. The number of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations in Philadelphia has more than tripled since 2016. Four-hundred and forty-eight (448) new solar projects came online in 2018 alone, making it a record year for the City’s burgeoning solar industry. Despite this recent progress, solar is still relatively new to Philadelphia and many sustainably minded building owners and architects may not know where to begin or how to best evaluate available financing options to take advantage of the energy-, cost-, and carbon-savings potential of this exciting technology.

Attendees will learn the principles of residential and commercial solar finance for urban markets, how to evaluate financing options for a diversity of building-types and ownership structures, and how Philadelphians can deploy more solar to currently underserved markets, including the commercial sector and low- and moderate-income households.

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenters 

Thea Gudonis, Solar States
Matt Handel, Alliance Partners HSP | The Shidler Group
Chris Spahr, Centennial Parkside CDC  
Moderator | Ben Vila, Philadelphia Energy Authority

 

Designing a Hybrid Ventilation System for Occupant Comfort and Energy Savings

Hybrid ventilation systems can improve interior working conditions while also reducing energy consumption. This presentation will describe the experimental process of designing a hybrid system within a retrofit industrial building.

In 2015, KieranTimberlake adapted a pre-existing bottling factory into its new Philadelphia studio. With intent to minimize reliance on mechanical cooling, they engaged Transsolar to design a control strategy that would provide effective hybrid natural ventilation while balancing occupant comfort and energy consumption. Transsolar developed a model that was calibrated using comprehensive building performance data collected by KieranTimberlake. This strategy allowed Transsolar to iterate modes of operation with comparative results relative to occupant comfort and energy consumption.

This presentation will discuss the process and technical aspects surrounding the design and implementation of this system. It will explore lessons learned through trail-and-error and simulation. The principles derived from this case study can be applied to projects at multiple scales and locations.

Level 400: Mastery

Presenters 

Jason Ciotti-Niebish, KieranTimberlake
Kit Elsworth, KieranTimberlake
Krista Palen, Transsolar Kilma Engineering

 

Equity Is: Perspectives from business, communities, and practice

What do we mean when we say “equity”? Does the answer change in business, in development, in the workforce? How does a diverse project team produce better outcomes? How does equitable development benefit a local community and the larger society?

This panel discussion will seek to define the term “equity” in sustainable design, business, construction, and development. Experts from across the city, region, and nation will provide wisdom, insights, and case studies to show the challenges and benefits of achieving equity in their fields and within the communities they serve.

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenters 

Beth McConnell, PACDC
Odetta Macleish-White, TransFormation Alliance
Samantha Porter, City of Philadelphia Office of Community Empowerment and Opportunity
Moderator | Kristen Suzda, WRT

 

Grid-Scale Solar: Elevating Southwestern PA’s impact on the state’s solar future

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) established a goal for increasing solar electricity generation across Pennsylvania to 10 percent by 2030. Although Pennsylvania's Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard requires only 0.5 percent, the current capacity is less than 0.25 percent. For the state to reach this ambitious new goal, 10 to 12 gigawatts of new production are needed across the Commonwealth. Reaching this target will require the deployment of grid-scale solar installations across the state. Optimizing siting and placement choices is fundamentally important to understand how to maximize the value of solar generation assets and other distributed energy technologies to the electric grid while minimizing technical, social and environmental costs.

In partnership with DEP, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) studied the feasibility of deployment in a pilot nine-county region. A working collaboration of stakeholders, including solar developers, policymakers, residents and commercial owners, and universities, this presentation will outline CMU's environmental, economic, technical, and policy-related impacts and feasibility results and findings.

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

Hayley Book, Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission

Krysia Kubiak, Duquesne Light Company

David Althoff, Jr., Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection - Pollution Prevention and Energy Assistance Office
Moderator | Anna J. Siefken, Carnegie Mellon University - Scott Institute for Energy Innovation

 

GSI Research to Practice: Lessons learned from the I-95 corridor reconstruction 

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) is incorporating extensive green stormwater infrastructure into the reconstruction of the I-95 corridor in Philadelphia, which will take place over the next 25 years. These stormwater management practices (SMPs) are designed to capture the first inch or more of stormwater that falls on the highway and allow it to infiltrate rather than enter the storm sewer network. The use of SMPs to manage stormwater runoff stems from requirements of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and the Philadelphia Water Department’s Green City, Clean Waters program, which were designed to address combined sewer overflow problems in Philadelphia.

Villanova University, in partnership with Temple, has developed and is continuing a fundamental and applied research program to advance the knowledge base of the profession, and to assist and inform PennDOT and its consultants on stormwater management design and maintenance practices implemented as part of the I-95/GIR project, which are transferable across the Commonwealth. Presenters will discuss what has been learned from the research to date.

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

Edwina Lam, AECOM
Erica McKenzie, Temple University
Bridget Wadzuk, Villanova University
Christian Lynn, AECOM
Moderator | Robert Traver, Villanova University

 

Headlining the Industry: How media shapes the sustainability narrative 

Due to the administration’s vocal perspective on climate change, sustainability topics are gaining momentum and making more headlines than ever before. Buildings play an important role in this conversation because they are considered a major creator of CO2 emissions; however, the sustainability narratives we read on a daily basis come from the media who play an integral role in shaping this story.

This panel will delve into media’s role in telling sustainability stories, including buildings’ contribution to climate change and how local governments can create positive change in spite of the administration’s intent. Moderated by Laura Emanuel, Vice President at Brownstein Group, this panel will include media from The Philadelphia Inquirer, GlobeSt.com, and The Architect’s Newspaper, who will share their unique perspectives on how they cover sustainability news. They will also provide recommendations for how firms can best approach them with specific insights on larger trends and project-specific news.

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenters 

Frank Kummer, The Philadelphia Inquirer
Steve Lubetkin, NJ/PA Editor, GlobeSt.com
Gabrielle Golenda, The Architect's Newspaper
Moderator | Laura Emanuel, Brownstein Group

 

Health & Well-Being in High-Performance Offices: Pursuing WELL with the Wharton School

As seen in WELL and LEED v4, organizations are prioritizing wellness to improve employee engagement and satisfaction. This presentation shall feature a detailed case study of a high-performance office environment for the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. This 20,000 square foot fit-out was completed in August 2018 and is pursuing Silver Certification under the WELL v1 Building Standard.

Typically, Wharton requires LEED Gold Certification, but this shall be the first WELL project across the University’s portfolio. Wharton chose WELL to demonstrate their commitment to health and well-being and to test innovative strategies for future projects. The presentation will describe our approach for managing the WELL certification process and incorporating wellness in design, construction, and operational practices.

With only 300+ WELL projects in the United States, this presentation is designed to inspire more project teams to incorporate wellness in project objectives and innovative strategies for positive health outcomes.

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

Chloe Bendistis, The Sheward Partnership
Michael Pavelsky, The Sheward Partnership
David Mazzocco, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

 

LEED in the City: Lessons learned by the City of Philadelphia

With over 600 facilities in its portfolio, the City of Philadelphia amended its code in 2009 to require that new construction and major renovations for many facilities meet LEED Silver specifications, specifically to target energy efficiency goals. Since then, the City has learned valuable lessons on what can work within the structuring of City contracts and building maintenance and operations, ultimately affecting the design and construction process.

Hear lessons learned from project professionals representing Philadelphia’s Office of Sustainability and Department of Public Property as they talk about municipal projects of the past and present covering design, construction and post-occupant operations.

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenters 

Roy Conard, City of Philadelphia, Department of Public Property 
Michelle Shuman, City of Philadelphia, Department of Public Property 
Paul Spiegel, Practical Energy Solutions
Moderator | Dominic McGraw, City of Philadelphia, Office of Sustainability 

 

Lessons from a Certified EnerPHit Industrial Building in Sri Lanka

Jordan Parnass Digital Architecture and Steven Winter Associates have been working remotely with a project team across the world to retrofit an outdated factory in Katunayake, Sri Lanka and turn it into an EnerPHit certified garment manufacturing facility. Construction began on the facility in fall 2016, preliminary testing and verification took place in fall 2017, and final testing was conducted in the spring of 2018. The project was certified to as EnerPHit Pilot project in summer of 2018 and over a year’s worth of utility data is showing up to 60 percent in energy savings when compared to the pre-retrofit factory.

This presentation will focus on the challenges of: 1) Certifying projects in hot humid regions of the world, and 2) Remotely performing QA/QC to ensure the PH standard is being met, and 3) performing air leakage testing in remote areas.

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

Dylan Martello, Steven Winter Associates
Jordan Parnass, Parnass Digital Architecture

 

Lessons from the Navy Yard: Sustainable commercial development

The Navy Yard is a dynamic, sustainable urban campus that arose from the transformation of the former Philadelphia  Naval  Shipyard. One of the nation’s oldest  shipyards, the Navy Yard was closed in 1996. Since 2003, Liberty Property Trust (LPT) has worked to develop the Navy Yard, where more than $1 billion has been invested into the campus. Today, the Navy Yard is a mixed-use community filled with energy, ideas, and rich history, united together on more than seven miles of waterfront, occupying 7.5 million square feet of real estate in a variety of historic buildings and  new high-performance and LEED certified construction. 

This effort has impacted LPT's approach to commercial development beyond the Navy Yard, positioning them as one of the nation's leaders in sustainable, high-performance development. The panel will discuss specific lessons learned at the Navy Yard and describe how they have led LPT to develop the industry’s first procedure-based LEED Volume Program, which ensures that every Liberty industrial development achieves LEED certification. Within the context of this overview, panelists will describe the technical, economic, and financial challenges and the strategies and methods that have evolved over this multi-year, multi-building endeavor.

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

Jeff Goldstein, DIGSAU
Brian Cohen, Liberty Property Trust
Bryan Astheimer, Re:Vision Architecture 

 

Living Air Conditioning and Carbon Sponges: Biophilic solutions to urban heat islands

The heat island effect is directly exacerbated by climate change and represents one of the most potentially devastating impacts for the health of urban populations. Climate scientists predict that within 30 years, Philadelphia will spend as many as 74 days/year above 90 degrees farenheit - seven weeks more than we currently experience. While the sustainability field focuses on high-tech mechanisms to slow the accumulation of heat-trapping carbon dioxide, we must also work with nature’s low-tech expertise to cool our city. Biophilic solutions encompass not only carbon neutral initiatives, but carbon negative strategies, with well designed, integrated natural materials that act as carbon sponges.

Using the Sustainability Office’s Heat Vulnerability Index, this session will cover the issue of equity (low income communities being the most vulnerable) into the larger, proactive, and positive discussion of how we can rebuild the city as resilient, vibrant habitat. 

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenters 

Helena van Vliet, Helena van Vliet LLC; BioPhilly
Laura Hansplant, Roofmeadow
Fredda Lippes, City of Philadelphia, Department of Public Property; BioPhilly
Moderator | Sadie Francis, BioPhilly

 

Meeting the Spiritual, Ethical, and Existential Challenges in the Age of Climate Change

Synergy is when actions have an effect greater than the sum of their parts. Faith does this. The IPCC report is a clarion call to act. Our communities must do more than learn how to build sustainably. We must synergistically address the human beings inclusive of the whole natural world. We have intense feelings, conflicts, and challenges as we face, avoid, or deny the crisis. These distresses impact our ability to make the decisions to move in a positive collective fashion.

The panel - a Rabbi, Iman and Reverend, moderated by a spiritual atheist - will focus on sources and resources for sustaining hope in the face of mounting effects of climate change.  What do our faith traditions offer not only as a charge or set of ethics/values to become active, but to support and sustain us through these troubled times? How might these resources be of value to everyone regardless of one’s religiosity?

Level 100: Awareness

Presenters 

Daniel Swartz, Coalition on the Environment and Jewish Life
Alison Cornish, PA Interfaith Power and Light
Saffet Catovic, GreenFaith and Green Muslims of New Jersey
Moderator | Laura Blau, BluPath Design 

 

Real Estate Going Green: Maximizing green building valuation via real estate professionals, the MLS, and appraisers 

Real estate is inherent to every green building project, but it is not frequently addressed within the green building community. Likewise, energy efficiency, water savings, wellness, walkable neighborhoods, and other green building features are burgeoning segments of the real estate market, yet they remain a limited focus for many real estate professionals and consumers. This panel aims to alter that dynamic as it explores the expanding synergies at the nexus of real estate and green building design.

The panel will detail how the real estate industry plays an increasingly complimentary role to the green building sector, and identify where there is room for improvement. It will also highlight how the green building industry can better translate its features and benefits to real estate professionals and their clients.

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

Amanda Stinton, National Association of REALTORS®
Betsy Hanson, Council of Multiple Listing Services 
Woody Fincham, Valucentric
Moderator | Keith Parsons, Keller Williams Real Estate

 

Regenerative Agriculture and Climate Change: Saving the planet with food

Global climate change is accelerating. Extremely aggressive emissions reductions are required to limit the damage from these changes - over and above those negotiated in the 2016 Paris Agreement. Learn the state of the world from a climate scientist and explore solutions through agriculture.

Carbon Farming is farming in a way that reduces greenhouse gas emissions or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils. It is managing land, water, plants and animals to restore ecosystems, ameliorate climate change, and provide nutrient dense food and educational opportunities. Also described as Regenerative Agriculture, these goals are achieved through a focus on lower-sequestration strategies like no-till organic annual cropping, perennial crops, and managed grazing.

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

Edward Dunlea, Carnegie Mellon University - Mellon College of Science
Chad Adams, Ground Plan Studio

 

Regenerative Community Redevelopment: From disinvestment to regeneration

For too long, sustainability has been understood as incremental improvements to business as usual. True sustainability of life on the planet would imply that every human intervention and every design decision would serve to meet our current needs while not impairing future generations from doing the same. Our industrial economy is inherently extractive and the planet is decidedly finite. As runaway climate change and chemical pollution illustrate, we need a total reversal from “less-badism” to “regeneration”. 

Drawing on a half-century history of regenerative design and systems thinking practice, our team endeavors to achieve regenerative design and practice while working within the constraints of the affordable housing and construction industry. We will share an introduction to regenerative design principles and process, and case studies from three projects in Baltimore and Pittsburgh. All of the projects discussed have the general goals of Passive House performance, the aspiration of Zero Energy, low carbon construction, and true community partnership. Special focus will be placed on the process and early outcomes of community engagement and equity efforts.

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenters 

Michael Hindle, Passive to Positive
Carri Beer, CommONEcology
Candace Chance, The VPI Firm
Moderator | Courtney Koslow, Beacon Communities

 

Renewables, Nuclear, and How Pennsylvania's Electricity Grid Might Change

This session will explore how Pennsulvania's grid is changing through three different lenses. First we will explore and understand the City of Philadelphia's Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) with Adams Solar LLC, which will help build the state's largest solar project today. Using this as an example, next we will discuss how institutions and organizations can do PPA's. Attendees will learn about how PJM, the regional grid operator, and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, influence the electricity markets and how businesses can get involved. Lastly, we will discuss what the Pennsylvania state legislature is considering to influence and change Pennsylvania electricity grid with specific emphasis on how nuclear and renewable energy power plants might benefit.

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenters 

Adam Agalloco, City of Philadelphia
Mark Szybist, NRDC
Christina Simeone, University of Pennsylvania 

 

Smart for All: Smart thermostats in low income multifamily

This session will review the initial outcomes of a large scale utility pilot aimed at determining the potential savings impacts of smart thermostats in low and moderate income multifamily rental units. Speakers will discuss the challenges encountered from a technical perspective, as well as insights into the user experience from resident and building owner perspectives. The pilot installed almost 1000 thermostats across a variety of building and system types, provided a range of building level connectivity solutions, and included multiple thermostat brands. Speakers will also discuss an assessment of market potential, taking into account the limitations and opportunities encountered in the pilot.

Impact evaluation will be ongoing through 12 months post-installation (through end-of-2019), so this session will focus on the wealth of lessons learned from the initial design and implementation experience, with presenters from the utility, implementer and IoT teams.

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenters 

Ben Adams, MaGrann Associates
Rachael Fredericks, Public Service Electric & Gas 
Charlie Hill, STRATIS IoT

 

Social Impact Investing Fact vs. Fiction: A real thing or just smoke and mirrors?

Environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria are a set of standards that focuses on a company’s operations that socially conscious investors use to screen potential investments. Environmental criteria look at how a company performs as a steward of nature. Social criteria examine how a company manages relationships with its employees, suppliers, customers, and the communities where it operates. Governance deals with a company’s leadership, executive pay, audits, internal controls, and shareholder rights.

Stockbrokers have recently been introducing opportunities for their customers to invest in ESG through ETFs and other assets. Robo-advisors like Betterment have used ESG to appeal to younger investors that are concerned with more conscientious investments. In this Introductory session we will explore what ESG investing is all about, and how its principals  are being used as a filter, screen, and overlay for investing purposes. 

Level 100: Awareness

Presenters 

Jennifer Wong, Glenmede
Daniel Alger, Goldman Sachs
Chris Pyke, ArcSkoru
Moderator | Brad Molotsky, Duane Morris

 

Staying Below 1.5C°:  Where cities, states, and regions fit into global climate action 

The imperative for rapid, massively scaled climate action grows with each passing year. Broad scientific consensus sets the limit for a livable future at 1.5°Celsius in global temperature rise, and the only way to achieve this is through deep, sustained cuts in carbon emissions. While these two goals are clear, the pathways to achieving 50 percent emissions reduction by 2030, 80 percent by 2050, and carbon neutrality by the end of the century are complex and fraught with challenges. 

Working backward from 2050, this panel will briefly review the tools and technologies available to achieve the required reductions in carbon emissions (good news, they already exist!). This will be followed by an in-depth discussion on which roles are best for various actors can in getting to the 1.5° goal with solutions focused on health, equity, and economic prosperity. Cities can play a leadership role on innovative policy and program implementation, but their scope of impact is limited. States have more regulatory power to move energy markets, but can be very slow to change. Regions leverage broader economic footprints, but lack central governance. Better collaboration across these scales will also be necessary to maximize the potential of current climate efforts. 

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

Alex Dews, Green Building United

Ariella Maron, Lion Advisors

 

The 2030 Challenge for Planning: Reducing transportation emissions  

Buildings and transportation are responsible for more than half of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To prevent the worst impacts of climate change, a concerted effort is needed on the global, regional, community, and building levels to limit GHG emissions. 2030 Districts bring together property owners and managers with professional and community stakeholders, local governments, and utilities to achieve voluntary reductions in energy and water use, and in transportation emissions by the year 2030.

Only five of the 22 2030 Districts across the United States and Canada baseline and track transportation emissions. As the fastest growing source of GHGs, there is lack of standardized methodology to measure transportation emissions at a district scale. 2030 Districts provide a unique opportunity to create one. This session will provide a review of planning themes that are emerging across all 2030 Districts and present a potential standardization methodology for reducing transportation emissions in the districts.

Level 300: Application/Implementation

Presenters 

Paul Levy, Center City District 
Katie Bartolotta, Green Building United
Sarah Rienheimer, Duke Univerisity
Moderator | Yogesh Saoji, WRT

 

The AIA COTE Top Ten Toolkit: Closing the information gap

In December 2018, the AIA Committee on the Environment (COTE) released a new sustainable design tool - the COTE Top Ten Toolkit - along with an easy to use, interactive “Super Spreadsheet”.  This tool draws from the collective wisdom of over 20 years of exemplary projects in the COTE Top Ten Award program and gives project teams the resources to create high performing, sustainable designs for all projects, even those not pursuing awards.

In this PechaKucha-style session, presenters from different sized design firms will review the purpose behind this new design tool, give an overview of the Ten Measures in the Top Ten Framework, and demonstrate how Design teams are using the “Super Spreadsheet” to make specific projects more sustainable.

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenters 

David Hincher, Ballinger; AIA COTE® Top Ten Toolkit Committee Member
Daphne More, Daphne More AIA, LLC
Paul Thompson, IEI Architects
Sherman Aronson, BLT Architects 
Jonathan Weiss, Jacobs
Brian Smiley, HOK, Inc.; AIA Philadelphia COTE® Chair; AIA Pennsylvania COTE® Co-Chair

 

We Should Know Better: Top 10 multifamily design mistakes

The residential building industry has made incredible progress toward sustainability and energy efficiency goals. At the same time, registered architect, building scientist, senior green rater, and session presenter, Steve Klocke, has found that many new buildings underperform because designers continue to make simple, avoidable mistakes. The affordable housing market in particular has the most to gain (and lose) when mistakes impact health, durability, tight schedules, and tighter budgets. Smart design choices yield buildings that are easier to build, resulting in lower costs, more predictable construction schedules, and higher quality buildings. The inspections, testing, and commissioning are more successful, and most importantly, a building that incorporates smart design decisions is more valuable to owners and occupants. Based on lessons learned while certifying nearly 1,500 dwelling units over the past eight years, Klocke will present the top ten design mistakes being made over and over again, and how to avoid them.

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenter 

Steve Klocke, Steven Winter Associates

 

WELL and Fitwel: Fads or keys in our evolution towards sustainable, livable work spaces?

In 2011, the Center for Active Design (CFAD) was launched by then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg to transform New York City’s groundbreaking Active Design program into an international movement. Over the last five years CFAD has gone global, reaching over 180 countries and informing the design of buildings and public infrastructure projects around the world.
The Fitwel Certification System marks a new chapter in CFAD’s work. By providing a standard for the building industry, Fitwel supports widespread adoption of health promoting strategies through a user-friendly digital portal. This comes at a time when health has become increasingly important to building owners and developers, in response to growing demand from consumers. 

WELL is a building standard curated by the International Well Building Institute that focuses on various components of an individual experience within the built environment to measure specific health outcomes. With over 1,548 WELL projects worldwide, 313 million feet of WELL certified space in over 48 countries, and over 7,619 professionals certified or working on certification in 81 countries, WELL continues to grow in reach and depth.

In this session we will explore the shift towards the indivual and productivity measuring – via WELL and Fitwel. 

Level 200: Understanding/Comprehension

Presenter 

Joanna Frank, Center for Active Design
Rachel Gutter, International Well Building Institute 
Moderator | Brad Molotsky, Duane Morris

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